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FROM THE EDITOR

Market Boom for New Building Energy Management Systems

Residential and commercial buildings account for 39% of total US energy consumption and 38% of CO2 emissions. It makes sense that companies would buy in to new energy management systems to reduce use and emissions, reports Energy Management Today. Building energy management systems (BEMS) integrate software, hardware, ICT technologies and services to help monitor, control, and automate building functions, resulting in effective energy efficiency management. A new report from Global Market Insights projects that the global building energy management systems market will grow to more than $6 billion in the next six years. Notable BEMS players include Honeywell, Ingersoll-Rand, IBM, Johnson Controls, Jones Lang LaSalle, Schneider Electric, Siemens, and Toshiba. Once again, business finds opportunity in innovation. 

John Howell, Editorial Director

Special Announcement: Ethical Corporation offers webinar Sept 26 re. how 3M Williams-Sonoma and SupplyShift leverage data to transform supply chains

News & Blogs

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