Mars

Business Is In a Position To Lead On Climate Action

When it comes to the environment, the Trump presidency is a string of bad news. Recently, President Trump announced that the U.S. would pull out of the Paris climate agreement. “So, we’re getting out,” he proclaimed.

Mars and Nestlé Take Steps To Clean Up Their Seafood Supply

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Mars and Nestlé recently announced that they will take steps to ensure their pet food supply chains are free of illegally caught seafood and human rights abuses. Nestlé is committed to a full ban on transshipment at sea in its supply chains. Mars committed to suspending the use of transshipped products in its supply chains if its suppliers do not address the illegal fishing and human rights issues.

Mars Urges The Business Community And Global Leaders To Take Bold Action To Tackle Climate Change

(3BL Media/Justmeans) – John Kerry, the US Secretary of State says the outgoing Obama administration wants to prevent the withdrawal of the US from the landmark Paris deal to prevent catastrophic climate change. “This is bigger than one person, one president,” Kerry said in Marrakech, before his last address to the UN climate summit being held here, the 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties (COP22).

How Mars Inc. Is Meeting Its Environmental Goals

Mars Inc. is known for making candy and pet food. Now the company can be known for achieving its zero waste to landfill goal. As of December 31, 2015 none of the company’s 126 manufacturing sites globally sends waste to landfill. In 2007, Mars sent over 154,000 tons of waste to landfill. 

How Mars Is Becoming More Environmentally Friendly

Mars, Incorporated is making strides to be more environmentally friendly. The company known for its chocolate reduced greenhouse gas emissions from its operations by 25 percent and sent zero waste to landfill from its 126 manufacturing sites around the world.

Mars Embeds Sustainability Into Its Operations

Mars, Inc. is known for its candy. Although the company owns other, non-candy brands, including pet food, making candy is how the company began. However, the company is also making a name for itself when it comes to sustainability. Take Mars Chocolate North America, which achieved zero waste to landfill certification in all 10 of its manufacturing plants. That means those manufacturing plants did not send garbage to landfills. 

12 Major Companies Sign Pact to Purchase More Renewable Power

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Most businesses will tell you that their reason-to-be is to meet their customers’ needs. So when a group of major corporations that use a great deal of energy get together to sign a pact asking their utilities to provide more renewable energy, one would expect utilities to take notice.

That is the rationale behind the Renewable Energy Buyers’ Principles, which focuses on buyers’ unmet demand for more renewable energy. The principles were jointly created by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the World Resource Institute (WRI) to help companies navigate the” increasing complexity and transaction costs” associated with large scale purchases of renewable power.

The twelve companies that signed the agreement are Bloomberg, Facebook, General Motors, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, Mars, Novelis, Procter and Gamble, REI, Sprint, and Walmart. All of these companies are driving towards carbon neutral operation.

It might be the cart leading the horse, but as Suzanne Apple of WWF says, “These companies are leading the market in creating demand for renewable energy. The Buyers’ Principles provide sound guidance to the market providers. Some of America’s largest companies are embracing renewable energy, and their collective demand requires the market to keep pace.”

The agreement includes a combined renewable energy target of 8.4 million megawatt hours (MWh) per year through 2020. The Buyers’ Principles contain six criteria that should significantly help companies meet these ambitious purchasing goals. These are:

  • Greater choice in procurement options,
  • More access to cost competitive options,
  • Longer- and variable-term contracts,
  • Access to new projects that reduce emissions beyond business as usual,
  • Streamlined third-party financing,
  • Increased purchasing options with utilities.
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