Nestlé

Nestlé is the Latest Company To Commit to Cage-Free Eggs

(3BL Media/Justmeans) — Many egg-laying hens in the U.S. spend their lives in cages only 67 square inches. That is smaller than a sheet of letter-sized paper. Battery cages are so small that hens are unable to turn around, flap their wings or engage is normal chicken behavior such as nesting, perching or dustbathing. Cage-free hens are able to walk, spread their wings and lay eggs in nests.

Sustainable Brands Detroit 2017 Sets Out to Redefine the Good Life


(3BL Media/Justmeans) — Sustainable Brands kicked off their 2017 event in downtown Detroit with a record crowd of over 2,000 attendees.  After a day filled with extended interactive workshops, the official welcome ceremony featured a who’s who of sustainability thought leaders. Koann Vikoren Skrzyniarz, Founder and CEO of Sustainable Brands, welcomed the crowd that packed the Cobo Center’s main hall. She set a somewhat sober tone for the event, citing that we live in an age of unintended consequences, and that we have clearly gotten off track in our pursuit of happiness. “Our push for productivity and efficiency has inclined us to forget how inextricably connected we are.”
But, she said, “Businesses are uniquely equipped…to help us shape our collective future.” Describing the decision to move from San Diego to Detroit, she called the actively rejuvenating Motor City, ‘a fantastic living lab.” Indeed Detroit could be the poster child for a place where the industrial age has run its course and is now ready for what comes next. Citing Harris poll data, she said that a clear shift is happening across the US in the definition of the good life.


Next, Kim Patel Ford’s VP of Sustainability spoke. Quoting her boss, Bill Ford, who she was standing in for, she said, “You can do good work for the planet and for the company.” Describing the company’s shifting commitment to mobility, she quoted Mayor Mike Dugan, who said, “Great if you have a good job, but if you can’t get there, what’s the point.” 

 
Cradle to Cradle originator Will McDonough made a number of terse, but punchy points.   
How do we make the world better because we are here?
Being less bad is not being good.
We need to think differently about carbon. There are three types: Fugitive carbon, Durable Carbon, and Living Carbon  We need less of the first one and more of the other two
By 2050, the weight of plastics in the ocean will be equal to the weight of all the fish.
As a roadmap for making things better he suggested five goods, to take the place of the numerous less bads.
Good Materials are safe, healthy, biological.
A Good Economy is circular, sharing, and shared
Good Energy is clean and renewable.
Good Water is clean and available.
A Good Life is creative and dignified.
What’s next is what’s now.
How much can we give for all that we get?  
Goodness is a living things.
It’s going to take forever, but that’s the point.

Mars and Nestlé Take Steps To Clean Up Their Seafood Supply

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Mars and Nestlé recently announced that they will take steps to ensure their pet food supply chains are free of illegally caught seafood and human rights abuses. Nestlé is committed to a full ban on transshipment at sea in its supply chains. Mars committed to suspending the use of transshipped products in its supply chains if its suppliers do not address the illegal fishing and human rights issues.

Nestlé’s “Creating Shared Value” Prize 2016 Backs Social Enterprises In Africa

(3BL Media/Justmeans) – There is a vibrancy of innovation across Africa, where social entrepreneurs are making a difference to improving the lives and economic prospects of Africa’s most vulnerable people and communities. The good news is that momentum is growing, with President Obama pushing entrepreneurship to the forefront of the US agenda by announcing the SPARK initiative to generate “m

Forests Play a Complex But Crucial Role in the Climate Change Equation

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Usually when we talk about climate change and what we can do to mitigate its impacts, we talk about ways to cut back carbon emissions through alternatives, or policy actions, or efficiency measures. We usually don’t think about the role that forests play in this equation. The fact is, forests absorb much of the carbon that our cars, and homes, and power plants emit—about a third of it, actually. That means that if we had three times as much forest as we do today, which, of course we did, not that long ago, we wouldn’t have that big of a problem keeping our climate the way it’s been for a long time.

Of course, forests take a long time to grow and we don’t exactly have millions of acres sitting around, doing nothing, that we can turn into forests. If anything, things are going the other way. Forests are continuously being turned into farmland to feed the growing population. The point is to recognize the important role that forests do play in this unfolding tale of our battle against time in the face of a climate that is becoming unstable.

The relationship is a complicated one, but it’s important that people understand it. Because of the vast amounts of carbon stored in forests, that means that all that carbon is slowly released when a forest is cut down, or very quickly released when a forest burns down.  One study found that deforestation was responsible for 8% of the world’s carbon emissions. Another interaction to consider is the fact that climate change is posing a significant threat to forests through warmer temperatures, droughts, and northward migration of insect pests, emboldened by the warmer temperatures. A recent report in the NY Times described a threat to the aspen trees of the American west, brought on by climate change-induced drought. Drought can also increase the likelihood of forest fires.

Nestlé Answers Concerns about Maggi Noodles, India’s Favourite Brand

(3BL Media/Justmeans) – India’s favourite brand of noodles, Maggi, is undergoing a food safety scare. Authorities in Delhi, the Indian capital, banned the sale of Maggi noodles for 15 days after high levels of lead were found in batches tested in the city and the state of Uttar Pradesh. Now, the government has ordered countrywide tests of samples.

Nestlé USA Factories Are Landfill Free

Who says a global food company has to send waste to landfills? Nestlé USA certainly doesn't think so. The company recently announced that all of its factories are landfill-free. All 23 of its factories in the U.S. do not send waste to landfills. 

Nestlé Removing Artificial Colors and Flavors From Its Chocolate Candy

Nestlé USA recently announced that it will remove artificial colors and flavors from all of its chocolate candy products by the end of 2015. That means that over 250 of the company’s products and 10 of its brands will be free of the controversial ingredients. By the middle of this year, store shelves will feature Nestlé products bearing the label “No Artificial Flavors or Colors.” 

Chocolate and Cocoa Companies Sign On To CocoaAction Program

Chocolate is incredibly popular. In the U.S. alone, chocolate sales reached $10.3 billion in 2013. Chocolate comes from cocoa which is grown on trees in countries on the equator. Most of the world’s cocoa supply comes from just two West African countries, Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. Both countries are the world’s top cocoa-producing countries, supplying over 55 percent of the world’s cocoa.

Major U.S. Companies Urge Congressional Action on Climate Change

Thirty-three of the country's largest companies have signed a Climate Declaration urging Congress to act on climate change.

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