A Report Both Sombre & Sobering

<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">As organisations like JustMeans and 21 "Century Network try to create a more just and sustainable world by bringing companies and people together and encouraging public debate so as to encourage positive change, a sobering report by the US National Intelligence Council (NIC) makes sombre reading.The United States leading intelligence organisation has warned that the world is entering an increasingly unstable and unpredictable period in which the advance of western-style democracy is no longer assured, and some states are in danger of being "taken over and run by criminal networks". The country that a President Obama takes over will no longer be able to "call the shots" alone, as its power over an increasingly multipolar world begins to wane.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">Just four years ago the NIC held a different view declaring globalisation irreversible and assumed an ongoing American supremacy. They argued that energy supplies were plentiful and climate change was hardly mentioned. Terrorism was the main challenge the US faced. These views have now been reversed and the basis of the Bush years fatally undermined.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">This will be a new world that Obama enters in January next &ndash; a world where uncertainty, global warming, resource shortages and global conflicts will increase unless there is a global approach to tackle these issues. The test of the Obama regime is whether he becomes global enough and can place the US in this new position comfortably enough. The NIC report states,</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">"Global institutions that could help the world deal with these transnational issues and, more generally, mitigate the risks of rapid change appear incapable of rising to the challenges without concerted efforts from their leaders,"<span style="mso-spacerun: yes;">&nbsp; </span></span></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">The financial meltdown of recent months has resulted in nations realising that they must work together and some politicians like Gordon Brown in the UK have taken a lead on this. In the next quarter of a century world governance must change. Problems can no longer be tackled incrementally. All our international systems, financial, economic, energy, security and much more will need to be reassessed and overhauled. </span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: small; font-family: Times New Roman;">Obama&rsquo;s success in the next 4 to 8 years will be based on whether he and other leaders can work in concert to challenge the fragmentation and incoherence at the heart of their governments and create a 21<sup>st</sup> Century world that will sustain itself in every sense.</span></p>