Energy CSR News

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Copper Theft Kills

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Copper theft is a deadly problem because it can injure or kill those stealing it and endanger the public. Law enforcement, scrap dealers and local citizens can help to prevent copper theft by increasing their aware­ness and reporting theft. You can help save a life. Would you be able to identify stolen electrical copper cables? This factsheet explains the copper theft problem and identifies ways to prevent this alarming and deadly crime.

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Copper Theft

Summary: 

Recognize and report metal theft. Stealing wire and equipment from electric utilities is dangerous, illegal and must be reported. Metal theft can cause power surges or outages and injury to an innocent person coming in contact with tampered equipment. Learn about the real life consequences of copper theft in this video.

 

AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.
 
AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).
 
AEP15483
video

Recognize and report metal theft. Stealing wire and equipment from electric utilities is dangerous, illegal and must be reported. Metal theft can cause power surges or outages and injury to an innocent person coming in contact with tampered equipment. Learn about the real life consequences of copper theft in this video.

 

AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.
 
AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).
 
AEP15483

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Planning is essential before digging in your yard

Summary: 

Planning is essential for safe digging, especially because you must call AT LEAST 48 hours before you plan to dig. After calling 811, utilities have at least 48 hours to come out and mark their lines with a color-coded paint or flagging system.

  • Red indicates electric power lines, conduit and cables.

  • Yellow represents gas, oil, petroleum or gaseous materials.

  • Orange is used for communication, alarm or signal lines.

  • Blue is the color used to indicate potable water.

  • Purple is reclaimed water, irrigation and slurry lines.

  • Green is the color for sewers and drain lines.

  • Pink is used to indicate temporary survey markings.

  • White is used before the locating services to mark the proposed excavating site.

 

Learn more about the 811 process in this informational video.

 

ABOUT AEP - American Electric Power

AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.
 
AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).

 AEP15480

video

Planning is essential for safe digging, especially because you must call AT LEAST 48 hours before you plan to dig. After calling 811, utilities have at least 48 hours to come out and mark their lines with a color-coded paint or flagging system.

  • Red indicates electric power lines, conduit and cables.

  • Yellow represents gas, oil, petroleum or gaseous materials.

  • Orange is used for communication, alarm or signal lines.

  • Blue is the color used to indicate potable water.

  • Purple is reclaimed water, irrigation and slurry lines.

  • Green is the color for sewers and drain lines.

  • Pink is used to indicate temporary survey markings.

  • White is used before the locating services to mark the proposed excavating site.

 

Learn more about the 811 process in this informational video.

 

ABOUT AEP - American Electric Power

AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.
 
AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).

 AEP15480

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Underground Line Safety

Blog

Know what’s below. Call 811 before you dig. Did you know that a simple job like planting a tree in your yard can jeopardize your safety? Many energized power and utility lines are buried just a few feet under the ground. Digging, trenching or excavating without knowing where utility lines are buried could be costly... and fatal. Before you dig, protect yourself and call 811 to have the area marked for utility lines.

Biofuels Slowly Take Flight with the Airline Industry

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Airlines won final approval from a U.S.-based technical-standards group to power their planes with a blend made from traditional kerosene and biofuels derived from inedible plants and organic waste.”

GM and ABB Demonstrate Battery Re-Use Applications

Summary: 

Earlier this year, General Motors signed a definitive agreement with ABB Group to identify joint research and development projects that would reuse Chevrolet Volt battery systems, which will have up to 70 percent of life remaining after their automotive use is exhausted.

Press Release

Earlier this year, General Motors signed a definitive agreement with ABB Group to identify joint research and development projects that would reuse Chevrolet Volt battery systems, which will have up to 70 percent of life remaining after their automotive use is exhausted.

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Minimum Safe Distances from Overhead Power Lines

Summary: 

Keep away from overhead power lines.  Keep long tools, ladders, scaffolding and other equipment away from overhead lines.  Minimum safe distances increase as line voltage increases.  Weather conditions and other factors also can affect safe distances.

The following minimum safe distances are based on line voltage:
  • Up to 50,000 volts (typical over head line) - Minumum clearance is 10 feet

  • 50,000 volts to 200,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 15 feet

  • 200,000 volts to 350,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 20 feet

  • 350,000 volts to 500,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 25 feet

  • 500,000 volts to 700,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 35 feet

  • 750,000 volts to 1,000,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 45 feet

AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.

AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).

AEP15439

video

Keep away from overhead power lines.  Keep long tools, ladders, scaffolding and other equipment away from overhead lines.  Minimum safe distances increase as line voltage increases.  Weather conditions and other factors also can affect safe distances.

The following minimum safe distances are based on line voltage:
  • Up to 50,000 volts (typical over head line) - Minumum clearance is 10 feet

  • 50,000 volts to 200,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 15 feet

  • 200,000 volts to 350,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 20 feet

  • 350,000 volts to 500,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 25 feet

  • 500,000 volts to 700,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 35 feet

  • 750,000 volts to 1,000,000 volts - Minimum clearance is 45 feet

AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.

AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).

AEP15439

AEP's Advice to the Public: Dangers of Overhead Power Lines

Contact with overhead power lines is usually accidental, but can result in severe injuries. Read how they can be prevented.
Blog

 

AEP's Advice to the Public: Overhead Line Safety

Look up for overhead power lines.
Summary: 

Look up for overhead power lines. Overhead power lines are not insulated like household power cords. What may look like insulation is actually weatherproofing material. Never touch an overhead power line.

Coming in contact with power lines can easily lead to electrocution. If your ladder of piece of equipment touches an overhead line, both you and the equipment can become the path for the electricity. Learn about the potential dangers of overhead power lines by watching these short videos.

AEP - American Electric Power
AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.

AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).

AEP15369

video

Look up for overhead power lines. Overhead power lines are not insulated like household power cords. What may look like insulation is actually weatherproofing material. Never touch an overhead power line.

Coming in contact with power lines can easily lead to electrocution. If your ladder of piece of equipment touches an overhead line, both you and the equipment can become the path for the electricity. Learn about the potential dangers of overhead power lines by watching these short videos.

AEP - American Electric Power
AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.

AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).

AEP15369

Electrical Public Safety at American Electric Power - Electrical Equipment Safety and Safety Tips

Summary: 

These are the last two videos demonstrating different scenarios illustrating what can happen if contact with electricity is made.  Please remember to always assume all electrical equipment is energized.  You can't see, hear or smell electricity. 

 
AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.
 
AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).
 
AEP15337
video

These are the last two videos demonstrating different scenarios illustrating what can happen if contact with electricity is made.  Please remember to always assume all electrical equipment is energized.  You can't see, hear or smell electricity. 

 
AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S.  AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.
 
AEP's utility units operate as AEP Ohio, AEP Texas, Appalachian Power (in Virginia, West Virginia), AEP Appalachian Power (in Tennessee), Indiana Michigan Power, Kentucky Power, Public Service of Oklahoma, and Southwestern Electric Power Company (in Arkansas, Louisiana and east Texas).
 
AEP15337

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