bananas

Reinventing Banana Production in Ecuador

Summary: 

As the largest banana exporter in the world, Ecuador outstands in Latin America in the cultivation of a fruit well known by people for its yellow color, its flavor and nutritional quality. In 2018, the country exported 344.8 million boxes weighing 18.14 kilograms each, according to the Association of Banana Exporters of Ecuador (AEBE). Due to its importance for local economy, farmers face the challenge of growing enough in a sustainable way. One of the solutions already implemented – and with great success – is the use of biological products to improve productivity, as well as to provide the integrated management of diseases and agrochemicals resistance.

Blog

As the largest banana exporter in the world, Ecuador outstands in Latin America in the cultivation of a fruit well known by people for its yellow color, its flavor and nutritional quality. In 2018, the country exported 344.8 million boxes weighing 18.14 kilograms each, according to the Association of Banana Exporters of Ecuador (AEBE). Due to its importance for local economy, farmers face the challenge of growing enough in a sustainable way. One of the solutions already implemented – and with great success – is the use of biological products to improve productivity, as well as to provide the integrated management of diseases and agrochemicals resistance.

Going Bananas for Innovation

Eastman doesn’t like a bad banana. With Eastman Banguard™, our customers don’t have to worry about them either.
Article

Through the acquisition of Taminco and its product lines in 2014, we increased focus in the food, feed and agriculture markets, including crop protection. Over the years, agrochemical development has been geared toward innovating fungicide solutions for fruit crops, such as bananas, due to the popularity and availability of the fruit around the world. Bananas typically grow in tropical areas, which makes the fruit susceptible to fungi.

The Story Behind Fair Trade

You've seen them on coffee and chocolate, but Fair Trade labels are popping on 500 million-plus pounds of produce nationwide. What exactly do they mean?
Article

No doubt you've seen Fair Trade labels on coffee, chocolate, and tea, but the certification is also popping up on honey, agave, quinoa, rice, sugar, apparel, and fruits and veggies. While you may pat yourself on the back when you throw any kind of produce into your grocery cart, reaching for Fair Trade Certified produce could be an even healthier pick for you, the environment, and the farmers who produce the food you eat. 

National Be Fair Survey Infographic

Multimedia with summary

October is Fair Trade Month and the results are in. Philadelphia reigns as the Fairest City in America, according to the 2013 Be Fair Survey, with Boston and Dallas-Fort Worth following closely behind. To kick off Fair Trade Month, Fair Trade USA, the leading third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in North America, celebrates America’s fairest cities and reminds consumers to Be Fair by choosing Fair Trade when they shop.

October is Fair Trade Month: Be Fair Survey Reveals Fairest Cities in America

Fair Trade USA and Partners Urge Americans to Be Fair
Press Release

Oakland, Ca., October 1, 2013 /3BL Media/ – It’s Fair Trade Month and the results are in. Philadelphia reigns as the Fairest City in America, according to the 2013 Be Fair Survey, with Boston and Dallas-Fort Worth following closely behind. To kick off Fair Trade Month, Fair Trade USA, the leading third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in North America, celebrates America’s fairest cities and reminds consumers to Be Fair by choosing Fair Trade when they shop.

The UN Guiding Principles in Nicaraguan Agriculture

Interview with SAI's Yolanda Brenes | 'Pillars in Practice' Project Sustains Progress of Previous Initiatives
Summary: 

Nicaragua's agricultural sector plays a major role in Nicaragua's economy. Employing an estimated 28% of the population, the sector offers both small-scale and large-scale farmers with the opportunities to enhance their livelihoods through production. However, like in many countries, the agricultural sector poses extraordinary challenges and safety risks for workers - such as the backbreaking physical labor needed to maintain crops, and the high-pressure seasonal demands to manage the harvest. 

The Nicaraguan agricultural sector is one of the three focus areas of SAI and the Danish Institute for Human Rights' 'Pillars in Practice' (PIP) Program. This month, SAI will launch its first set of multi-stakeholder round tables to discuss human rights issues in the sector, on April 25 in Chinandega and April 27 in Managua. The PIP Project's local CSO partner in Nicaragua - Profesionales para la Auditoria Social y Entreprenarial (PASE) - will lead this, and is represented by PASE Program Coordinator Alberto Legall López. We interviewed SAI Lead Trainer & Representative in Costa Rica, Yolanda Brenes, to discuss the relevance and context for the upcoming training, and its potential impact for workers. 

 

Newsletter

Nicaragua's agricultural sector plays a major role in Nicaragua's economy. Employing an estimated 28% of the population, the sector offers both small-scale and large-scale farmers with the opportunities to enhance their livelihoods through production. However, like in many countries, the agricultural sector poses extraordinary challenges and safety risks for workers - such as the backbreaking physical labor needed to maintain crops, and the high-pressure seasonal demands to manage the harvest. 

The Nicaraguan agricultural sector is one of the three focus areas of SAI and the Danish Institute for Human Rights' 'Pillars in Practice' (PIP) Program. This month, SAI will launch its first set of multi-stakeholder round tables to discuss human rights issues in the sector, on April 25 in Chinandega and April 27 in Managua. The PIP Project's local CSO partner in Nicaragua - Profesionales para la Auditoria Social y Entreprenarial (PASE) - will lead this, and is represented by PASE Program Coordinator Alberto Legall López. We interviewed SAI Lead Trainer & Representative in Costa Rica, Yolanda Brenes, to discuss the relevance and context for the upcoming training, and its potential impact for workers. 

 

Subscribe to bananas