Canadian Journal of Cardiology

Why We Need to Fund Newer Blood-thinning Agents to Prevent Strokes

Health professionals should engage with policy-makers to address care gaps due to misalignment of reimbursement policy and clinical guidelines, say physicians in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, November 19, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Care gaps are emerging due to disharmony between healthcare reimbursement policies and evidence-based clinical guideline recommendations, cautions a group of Canadian physicians. Writing in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, they use the example of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) to make a case for engaging with policy-makers to address the growing barriers to patients’ access to optimal care.

Governments Should Take an Active Lead in Creating Healthy Food Environments to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease, Say Cardiovascular Care Experts

In a policy statement published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, fifteen health organizations support a call for action to increase access to affordable healthy foods to improve cardiovascular health
Press Release

PHILADELPHIA, October 29, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Canadian health organizations are calling upon governments to take a leadership role in creating healthy food environments. They say that implementing strategies that facilitate access to affordable healthy foods and beverages in places where Canadians work, live, and play could play a key role in preventing diet-related disease and health risk such as obesity and hypertension, and ultimately improve cardiovascular health, This call for action is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

How Long Is Too Long to Wait for Groundbreaking New Aortic Valve Replacement Surgery Procedures?

Modest delays in treatment have substantial impact on effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in patients with severe aortic stenosis, say researchers in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, June 4, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Severe aortic stenosis (AS) has a grave prognosis with 25-50% of patients dying within a year once symptoms develop. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) represents a paradigm shift in the therapeutic options for these patients. Because of cost and availability issues, there are often waiting times for this procedure. Investigators have found that even modest increases in wait times have a substantial impact on the effectiveness of TAVR in individuals who need it the most: otherwise inoperable patients and high-risk surgical candidates.

Investigators Find Something Fishy with the Classical Evidence for Dietary Fish Recommendations

New study in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology questions the validity of original Bang and Dyerberg Study; finds Eskimos have coronary artery disease at the same rate as other populations
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, May 7, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Oily fish are currently recommended as part of a heart healthy diet. This guideline is partially based on the landmark 1970s study from Bang and Dyerberg that connected the low incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) among the Eskimos of Greenland to their diet, rich in whale and seal blubber. Now, researchers have found that Eskimos actually suffered from CAD at the same rate as their Caucasian counterparts, meaning there is insufficient evidence to back Bang and Dyerberg’s claims.

Hypertension Related to New Cancer Therapies – A New Syndrome Emerges

Mechanisms of VEGF inhibitor-induced hypertension need to be better understood and guidelines developed to improve management, say researchers in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, May 6, 2014 /3BL Media/ – New cancer therapies, particularly agents that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, have improved the outlook for patients with some cancers and are now used as a first line therapy for some tumors. However, almost 100% of patients who take VEGF inhibitors (VEGFIs) develop high blood pressure, and a subset develops severe hypertension.

Physical Inactivity After Cardiac Surgery Linked With Substantially Higher Risk of Depression

Patients undergoing cardiac surgery should be assessed for depression and physical activity, say researchers in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, December 19, 2013 /3BL Media/ New research indicates that inactive patients following cardiac surgery have a substantially higher risk of depression and that the number of patients suffering from depression after cardiac surgery is as high as 40%. Investigators recommend that cardiac patients should be assessed for depression and level of physical activity and remain as active as they safely can after surgery to minimize post-operative depression. The results are published in the December issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

Running a Marathon Can Be Bad for the Heart, Especially in Less Prepared Runners, Say Experts

Heart muscle changes are more common and widespread in runners with lower fitness and less training, according to new study in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, October 9, 2013 – Investigators who studied a group of recreational marathon runners have established that strenuous exercise such as running a marathon can damage the heart muscle. Although they found the effect is temporary and reversible, they warn that these effects are more widespread in less fit distance runners and that recreational distance runners should prepare properly before marathons. Their findings are published in the October issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.

Pediatric Atrial Fibrillation, Although Rare, Has Risk of Serious Complications and High Recurrence Rates

Lone atrial fibrillation in children has substantial symptomatic burden and recurrence rate say researchers in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, October 7, 2013 – Atrial fibrillation (AF), characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat, is the most common chronic arrhythmia in adults, but is rare in children. In one of the first studies of pediatric “lone AF” (AF without associated heart disease), researchers found a nearly 40% recurrence rate and that AF in the young is accompanied by substantial symptoms. Three patients had significant complications: one with a stroke and two with substantially impaired heart function.

Canadians Support Interventions to Reduce Dietary Salt

Eighty percent of survey respondents agree food industry should use less salt, according to new study published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Press Release

Philadelphia, PA, March 13, 2013 /3BL Media/ – Many Canadians are concerned about dietary sodium and welcome government intervention to reduce sodium intake through a variety of measures, including lowering sodium in food, and education and awareness, according to a national survey. The top barriers to limiting sodium intake are a lack of lower sodium packaged and processed foods and lower sodium restaurant menu options.

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