G20

Where Are We Now With Climate Change Solutions After the G20 Meeting and the Trump White House Abandonment of COP 21/Paris Agreement?

G&A's SustainabilityHighlights (13.07.2017)
Newsletter

All eyes were on Hamburg, Germany last week as the leaders of the "G20" nations** gathered. High on the agenda was climate change and sustainable development.  Mixed messages came out of the gathering, but as Jens-Peter Saul explains in our first Top story, even if governments can't agree in such gatherings, private industry is moving forward in providing climate change solutions.

Banorte and Global Investors Call on the G20 to Uphold Paris Agreement Commitments

GFNorte, the only Mexican institution forming part of the collective of 390 global investors
Summary: 

GFNorte, the only Mexican institution forming part of the collective of 390 global investors concerned about climate change.

The collective group represents $22 trillion US dollars in assets.

The group is committed to mitigating climate change as an imperative to safeguarding the global economy.

Press Release

GFNorte, the only Mexican institution forming part of the collective of 390 global investors concerned about climate change.

The collective group represents $22 trillion US dollars in assets.

The group is committed to mitigating climate change as an imperative to safeguarding the global economy.

Companies Should Report Possible Climate Costs, Say Global Executives

The information should routinely appear in financial statements, according to recommendations to be presented to G-20 leaders
Article

Originally posted on Wall Street Journal.

LONDON—Companies should publish an assessment of the losses they could suffer through climate change as part of their routine financial statements, according to a panel of financial and business executives chaired by Michael Bloomberg.

Carney Panel Urges CEO Compensation Link With Climate Risk

Article

Originally posted on Bloomberg.com

Energy companies should consider telling investors how executive compensation is linked to climate change risks, according to a panel advising the Group of 20 nations.

Mark Carney: Businesses Must Come Clean About Climate Change Risks to Avoid "Tragedy"

Firms must discuss the impact of specific climate change scenarios in their financial statements to ensure transparency, report says
Article

Mark Carney backed a raft of new measures to ensure businesses and investors do more to combat the “tragedy” of climate change.

The recommendations, published by an international task force headed by billionaire New York City mayor, Michael Bloomberg, said investors need more information about the risks companies face from global warming so they can properly allocate funds.

Click here to continue reading.

MPs from 34 Countries Write to Stock Exchanges Asking Them to Make Firms Reveal Climate Change Risks

The campaign follows comments by Bank of England governor Mark Carney
Article

An international alliance of over 100 MPs from 34 different countries have written to the world’s stock exchanges calling on them to factor in the financial risks of climate change.

Mark Carney said today that investors “currently don’t have the information to respond to these developments”.

Click here to read more.

Climate Disclosure Framework Creates a Better Environment for Investors

By Stephanie Leaist
Article

Stephanie Leaist is a member of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures, and managing director, Head of Sustainable Investing at Canada Pension Plan Investment Board

A year ago there was an air of optimism around the Paris Agreement to limit global warming. Driven by a sense of urgency, encouraging action has since been taken by policy makers, regulators, companies and investors, including the Financial Stability Board-led Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD). While progress has been made, in many ways, we’ve just begun.

G20 Task Force Wants Companies to Come Clean on Climate Risk

Article

A global task force set up to try to prevent market shocks from the warming of the planet will ask companies to disclose how they manage risks to their business from climate change and greenhouse gas emission cuts.

Although the measures recommended by the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) are voluntary, some of its members argue they should become mandatory.

"Only then will climate risk become integral to corporate governance and how we all do business," Mark Wilson, chief executive of insurance firm Aviva Plc, said in a statement.

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