Live Below the Line

Major League Baseball Players Trust to Live Below the Line in support of Physicians for Peace and other nonprofits

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From April 27 through May 1, the Major League Baseball Players Trust is joining forces with The Global Poverty Project’s Live Below the Line campaign to raise awareness and funds for the more than 1.2 billion people around the world living in extreme poverty (Learn more here.).  

Through the Players Trust, Major Leaguers provide funding to support the work of several non-profits dedicated to helping improve the lives of people living below the poverty line. One such partner is Physicians for Peace.   

Major League Baseball Players LaTroy Hawkins and Drew Stubbs Grocery Shop in Support of Live Below the Line Challenge

Press Release

NEW YORK, NY, Tuesday, April 14, 2015 – In a video released today by the Major League Baseball Players Trust, Major Leaguers LaTroy Hawkins and Drew Stubbs of the Colorado Rockies are featured grocery shopping on a budget of $15.00 in support of the upcoming Live Below the Line challenge. 

To view the video, please click here.

Players Trust takes Live Below the Line Challenge for International Nonprofits

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Major League baseball players, through the Players Trust,  are focused on identifying and funding innovative approaches to help eradicate issues associated with poverty around the world.

For example, in 2008, more than one in 20 children under five years of age was dying from preventable causes in the province of Barahona, located in the western region of the Dominican Republic near the Haitian border.

Players Trust Joins “Live Below The Line” Kickoff Event In NYC

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“Empathy not Sympathy” was the theme for the “Live Below the Line” official launch party.

In addition to the Players Trust, representatives from campaign partners Concern Worldwide, Heifer International, Opportunity International, UNHCR, Unicef and The Hunger Project also convened at Milk Studios in Manhattan on Friday night to celebrate the campaign launch.

Major League Baseball Players Trust Joins LIVE BELOW THE LINE Challenge

Annual campaign features celebrities and influencers living on $1.50 for food and drink to raise funds and draw attention to 1 billion people living in extreme poverty
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RACHEL BROSNAHAN, ERIN RICHARDS, TAMZIN MERCHANT AND OTHERS WILL ALSO LIVE BELOW THE LINE TO RAISE FUNDS TO HELP END EXTREME POVERTY

Press Release

RACHEL BROSNAHAN, ERIN RICHARDS, TAMZIN MERCHANT AND OTHERS WILL ALSO LIVE BELOW THE LINE TO RAISE FUNDS TO HELP END EXTREME POVERTY

Players Trust Strives to Keep Women "Above the Line"

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Women comprise about half the world’s population yet about 75 percent of the people living in poverty. The Players Trust wants to do something about that.

Through its new partnership with Global Citizen’s “Live Below the Line” campaign, Major Leaguers are joining an effort to focus more awareness on the issue and help eradicate extreme poverty by 2030 but it has long been an issue close to the hearts of Major Leaguers.

Players Trust Encourages Others to Live Below the Line

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The Players Trust is joining Global Citizen’s Live Below the Line fundraising and awareness campaign in 2015 to help improve living conditions for the 1.2 billion impoverished people around the world.

The Live Below the Line campaign challeges people across the U.S., Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom to feed themselves with just $1.50 a day – the equivalent of the international Extreme Poverty Line – so they can better understand the lack of choice and opportunity faced by people living in poverty.

Lilly Challenges Others to Live Below the Line on World Hunger Day

By David Marbaugh
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Could you nourish your mind and body on $1.50 or less per day? For the 1.2 billion people in the world who live in extreme poverty, it’s not a matter of “could” but “how.”

Poverty breeds hunger, and like many other public health threats, hunger is not biased when it comes to age, race, religion or location. People living in Congo,  Israel and Mississippi share the same risk for malnutrition, vitamin deficiency and, potentially, death because of a lack of affordable and accessible nutritious food.

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