ocean pollution

Reflecting on Our Ocean Plastic Summer Internship

Summary: 

The following is a guest blog from Dell’s ocean plastic supply chain summer interns Allison Ward and Dan Partin, graduate students at the University of Michigan’s Tauber Institute for Global Operations.

Blog

The following is a guest blog from Dell’s ocean plastic supply chain summer interns Allison Ward and Dan Partin, graduate students at the University of Michigan’s Tauber Institute for Global Operations.

How Dell & Givewith Engaged Customers in the Fight Against Ocean Pollution

Through social impact marketing, Dell is collaborating with customers to make things happen in the real world that benefit the environment and its brand.
Summary: 

In my field of marketing work, we’re always researching what our customers want – and we see that the tide is turning: Increasing awareness around societal and environmental issues has led to a rise in “conscious consumption.” Customers are increasingly seeking out ways to make positive decisions about what and how they buy.

As a company that makes corporate social responsibility part of everyday business, Dell loves this. We see real opportunity in collaborating with our customers on the values we share, to make things happen in the real world that benefit society, our environment and our brand.

Earlier this year, we began shipping the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 with a packaging system that contains 25 percent recycled ocean plastics. We’ll divert 16,000 pounds of plastic from our oceans in 2017 alone, and we are creating the first commercial-scale global ocean plastics supply chain.

When we recently learned about an innovative approach to share the ways we’re building a Legacy of Good and allow our online audience to give and support clean waterways, we jumped on it.

We collaborated with Givewith, a new social impact marketing platform. Givewith is bringing brands, consumers and nonprofit organizations together to tackle our most challenging social issues. Givewith Founder and CEO Paul Polizzotto has his own special relationship with water. Paul explains more about his company, his passion for the ocean and his work with Dell, below.

- Ann Lott, Director, Corporate Social Responsibility at Dell

 

Blog

In my field of marketing work, we’re always researching what our customers want – and we see that the tide is turning: Increasing awareness around societal and environmental issues has led to a rise in “conscious consumption.” Customers are increasingly seeking out ways to make positive decisions about what and how they buy.

As a company that makes corporate social responsibility part of everyday business, Dell loves this. We see real opportunity in collaborating with our customers on the values we share, to make things happen in the real world that benefit society, our environment and our brand.

Earlier this year, we began shipping the Dell XPS 13 2-in-1 with a packaging system that contains 25 percent recycled ocean plastics. We’ll divert 16,000 pounds of plastic from our oceans in 2017 alone, and we are creating the first commercial-scale global ocean plastics supply chain.

When we recently learned about an innovative approach to share the ways we’re building a Legacy of Good and allow our online audience to give and support clean waterways, we jumped on it.

We collaborated with Givewith, a new social impact marketing platform. Givewith is bringing brands, consumers and nonprofit organizations together to tackle our most challenging social issues. Givewith Founder and CEO Paul Polizzotto has his own special relationship with water. Paul explains more about his company, his passion for the ocean and his work with Dell, below.

- Ann Lott, Director, Corporate Social Responsibility at Dell

 

INTERFAITH OCEANS Applauds Carnival Corporation’s Moves to Sustainability and Service

Press Release

June 10, 2015 /3BL Media/ - Just four days before today’s World Oceans Day, Carnival Corporation unveiled their newest cruise line – fathom, dedicated to impact travel, where cruisers do volunteer work in the destination country. Invited to the announcement event were members of INTERFAITH OCEANS – a multi-faith ethics campaign dedicated to bridging faith and science, restoring oceans and their communities. Director Lorbiecki said,  “The poor everywhere are always the most harmed by environmental destruction.

GSU, CDC and Plastic Pollution Coalition Announce the 2015 Welch Symposium- Plastic GYRE: Artists, Scientists and Activists Respond

John Lanier, Foundation Executive Director to Speak at Event
Summary: 

John Lanier, executive director of the Ray C. Anderson Foundation will be speaking at this conference at 1:00 p.m. on March 26th along with Foundation friend, Scott Seydel who will represent the Sustainable Packaging Coalition and Elemental Impact.  Advisory Board Member, Laura Turner Seydel will be participating in the 3:00 p.m. panel on the 26th, along with Foundation friends, Olivia and Carter Ries of One More Generation.  On Friday, March 27th, Foundation friend, Rashid Nuri of Truly Living Well will participate in the 1:45 Session, discussing social justice as it applies to food systems.

Press Release

John Lanier, executive director of the Ray C. Anderson Foundation will be speaking at this conference at 1:00 p.m. on March 26th along with Foundation friend, Scott Seydel who will represent the Sustainable Packaging Coalition and Elemental Impact.  Advisory Board Member, Laura Turner Seydel will be participating in the 3:00 p.m. panel on the 26th, along with Foundation friends, Olivia and Carter Ries of One More Generation.  On Friday, March 27th, Foundation friend, Rashid Nuri of Truly Living Well will participate in the 1:45 Session, discussing social justice as it applies to food systems.

What You DON’T Know About the North Pacific Gyre

Blog

What You DON’T know about the North Pacific Gyre (aka Plastic Vortex)

Is Shock and Awe Effective in Cause Marketing?

Blog

We're excited to share an op-ed piece about Project Kaisei's "Save Kai" campaign that appeared in AdAge's Good Works Blog. The article addresses the question: Is Shock and Awe Effective in Cause Marketing? Drawing on examples of various cause-related campaigns consumers have encountered in recent years, the article makes a strong case for why campaigns must address both the "wow" AND the "why" elements to trully be effective.

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