Packaging

Portioned Coffee: An April Fool’s Attitude - A Critical Look At What Is True

By Daniel Weston, Global Head of Creating Shared Value (CSV), Nespresso
Article

Let me start by saying that I don’t expect you to believe what you are about to read. Why should you take an opinion of an executive of a multi-national at face value?

Savvier Consumers Driving Packaging Innovation: Michael Richmond, HAVI Global Solutions

In interview, Richmond previews Focal Point 2015 presentation
Article

Co-founder of Packaging and Technology Integrated Solutions (PTIS), Michael Richmond is a strategic business and technical leader with 30 years of experience with consumer packaged goods companies including Kellogg's and Kraft, and both research and teaching at Michigan State University in the School of Packaging. Richmond is a featured presenter at Focal Point 2015: Paper-Based Food Packaging and Serviceware.

Survey from Tetra Pak and Global Footprint Network Shows Climate Concerns Drive Packaging Choices

Poll Reveals Resource Scarcity Impacts Consumer Behaviors
Press Release

DENTON, Texas, August 13, 2015 /3BL Media/ – Despite the staggering rate of global natural resource consumption, resource constraints are still not a top of mind issue for Americans. However when knowledge and information is shared around resource scarcity, consumer attitudes, actions, and perceptions shift, according to a new snapshot survey from Tetra Pak Inc. undertaken with international sustainability think tank Global Footprint Network.

Sappi’s Laura Thompson Explains Why 2014 was a Pivotal Year of Change for the Paper Industry

2014 was a critical year for foundation building and refinement to position Sappi North America for the sustained future of Sappi’s employees, customers, investors and communities. Sappi's sustainability expert Laura Thompson reflects on the past year.
Article

For Sappi North America, 2014 may long be remembered as a pivotal year of change. We saw a merger of two of the biggest merchants in our supply chain as well as our two largest competitors. Coated paper markets struggled, a global economic slowdown hurt the sales of release papers, and dissolving pulp prices took a sharp downward turn. While it certainly had its challenges, 2014 was also a critical year for foundation building and refinement to position Sappi for the next generation.

A Driving Force for Social Responsibility and Change

Sappi takes a very active approach to social responsibility, driving key initiatives in support of our three key stakeholder groups: our employees, our customers and the local communities in which we operate.
Article

One of the ways we improve the lives of people is by promoting freedom of association, nondiscrimination and the abolition of forced and child labor. We also uphold the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Sappi Limited has been a signatory of the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC) since 2008. We submit an annual communication on progress that describes our company’s ongoing efforts to support the social and environmental principles of the UNGC. This report can be found at sappi.com under the “Group Sustainability” section.

Giving Waste New Meaning

Managing our solid waste and finding ways to minimize it remains a focus at all of Sappi North America’s mills.
Article

The conversion of the Cloquet pulp mill to manufacture dissolving pulp resulted in increased quantities of lime mud due to the cooking requirements of this higher-purity pulp. The impact of this change can be seen in both the total solid waste to landfill and the tonnes of solid waste processed through the Cloquet Mill’s beneficial use program with local farmers. Lime mud and boiler ash are used as a soil amendment to help farmers raise the soil pH, improving growing conditions for certain crops.

Conserving Water in North American Mills

All pulp and paper mills in North America use and treat water in accordance with comprehensive environmental permits.
Article

Sappi's North American mills use only surface water sources (rivers and lakes) and return treated water to the same primary source. (At Cloquet, we return the water to a publicly owned treatment facility, where it goes through additional purification and is then returned to Lake Superior.) We returned almost 93 percent of the water we used, creating a minimal water footprint. Water that is “consumed” in our operations is primarily made up of water lost to the environment due to evaporation during the paper drying process and a small amount of moisture contained in our finished products.

Creating a Minimal Footprint with Renewable Energy

In Sappi's 2012 report, we adopted a calculation method used by the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Forest and Paper Association (AF&PA).
Article

In this method, energy consumption from purchased electricity is calculated in terms of fuel inputs to account for different fuel efficiencies during power generation and efficiency losses in power transmission. The equivalent energy value is represented in terms of sources as per power supplier-provided data. Our Westbrook Mill does not buy power, and the mill energy profile reflects sales of Renewable Energy Certificates

How to Exceed Your 5-year Emissions Goal One Year Early

For several years, Sappi North America has had a major focus on the reduction of fossil fuels and the emissions associated with combustion.
Article

Intensity is a term that describes the usage of resources for, or output from, the manufacture of a set unit of product. We exceeded an aggressive five-year goal of a 40 percent reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity in just three years and are now working to reduce energy intensity. Overall, our performance in 2014 against these key emissions metrics was in line with 2013. A markedly colder winter impacted fuel consumption, slightly increasing our sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions, but we remain significantly below the industry average as reported by AF&PA.

Held to High Fiber Standards

One hundred percent of Sappi North America's fiber is procured in accordance with the SFI® Fiber Sourcing standard as well as the FSC® Controlled Wood standard.
Article

These third-party certification programs provide assurance that wood-based products have been procured from well-managed forests and are legally harvested. In 2014, we purchased more kraft fiber than historic levels to support the papermaking operations in Cloquet after the 2013 conversion of that pulp mill to dissolving wood pulp. All of our purchased pulp was certified by one or more standards, which is reflected in the higher percentage of “triple certified” fiber and in part responsible for us reaching our five-year goal one year ahead of schedule.

Pages

Subscribe to Packaging