World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

Beyond Selfies: African Youth Vow to Restore the Continent’s Landscapes

Exuding awesomeness but also vulnerability, youth are primed to spark restoration of Africa’s degrading landscapes
Blog

by Cathy Watson

On 27-28 August, over 60 youth from a dozen African countries gathered at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). Aged 18-35, they ranged from students to farmers to leaders of NGOs, small start-ups and rural enterprises. But they shared one goal – getting “restoration ready”.

Mongabay: Why Keep Africa’s Dryland Forests Alive?

Summary: 
  • Small holder farmers from 6,000 Malian households have restored 320 hectares of land through a combination of on-farm natural tree regeneration, water harvesting, moisture retention technologies, improved soil filtration, and enhanced soil humus.
  • This is just one of many efforts currently underway to restore Africa’s dryland forests. There are many obstacles left to overcome, but as the Mali example clearly shows, there are successes to celebrate and build upon, as well.
  • In sub-Saharan Africa, 80 percent of charcoal and firewood used by about 2.4 million people is harvested in woodlands found in the dryland areas. Experts say it’s time to start packaging these fragile yet rich and highly adaptive ecosystems into investment opportunities.
Blog
  • Small holder farmers from 6,000 Malian households have restored 320 hectares of land through a combination of on-farm natural tree regeneration, water harvesting, moisture retention technologies, improved soil filtration, and enhanced soil humus.
  • This is just one of many efforts currently underway to restore Africa’s dryland forests. There are many obstacles left to overcome, but as the Mali example clearly shows, there are successes to celebrate and build upon, as well.
  • In sub-Saharan Africa, 80 percent of charcoal and firewood used by about 2.4 million people is harvested in woodlands found in the dryland areas. Experts say it’s time to start packaging these fragile yet rich and highly adaptive ecosystems into investment opportunities.

From Farm to Fork: Strengthening Direct Sales Between Smallholders and Consumers in Cusco, Peru

Researchers say farmers need more help if they are to sell healthy farm products directly to city consumers
Blog

by Michelle Jackson, Environmental Consultant for ICRAF in Peru

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Agroforestry Could Make Agriculture Emissions-Neutral by 2050

At a defining conference centred around the forthcoming ASEAN Guidelines for Agroforestry Development, participants heard that integrating more trees into farming systems will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help farmers adapt to climate change.
Blog

by Renz Celeridad

Agroforestry is a major component of efforts to reduce the impact of climate change on farming. The practice of integrating trees into agriculture is a long tradition in most farming systems throughout the world. Agroforestry not only helps diversify farmers’ portfolios and spread risk but also provides environmental benefits that can only come from deep-rooted perennials, including sequestering carbon.

Agroforestry With Refugees in Uganda: Overwhelming Demand and a Huge Desire to Plant

Developing agroforestry models for refugees and host communities to meet their energy, construction and food needs.
Blog

by Cathy Watson

“There is space for trees in refugee settlements,” Clement Okia told officials, NGOs, donors and UN agencies on 30 June 2018, as the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) closed its first agroforestry project for refugees. “Before we started, we did not realize that refugees have such a commitment to plant,” said the ICRAF country representative in Uganda.

Lessons From Kenya on How to Restore Degraded Land

Blog

by Leigh Ann Winowiecki

The state of the earth’s biodiversity – the world’s variety of living organisms – is in crisis. About one third of the world’s land has been severely degraded from its natural state. Some of the worst forms of degradation include deforestation, soil erosion, loss of soil fertility, declining water quality and pollution.

How Soil Scientists Can Do a Better Job of Making Their Research Useful

Blog

Soil is a vital part of the natural environment. It supports the growth of plants, is a habitat for many different organisms and is at the heart of nearly all agricultural production. It also plays an integral role in countless other ecosystem services like water and climate regulation.

Prioritizing Enablers for Effective Community Forestry in Cameroon

Article

Cameroon, in its Law 94/01 of 1994 on Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, supported local communities to engage in managing forests and benefit from them economically and environmentally.

This provision in law allowed communities to have access to forests with the requirement that they obtained a legal status and signed an agreement with the government in which they committed to a set of conditions that maintained the state of the forest while creating livelihoods for local people.

Philippines to Access the Green Climate Fund

The Philippines is preparing a proposal to access the Green Climate Fund, a billion-dollar platform that bankrolls low-emission and climate-resilient programs in developing countries.
Blog

“Ambition enables finance,” said Redentor Constantino, executive director of the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, as he introduced another way of merging climate-related action and finance to achieve a low-carbon and resilient economy in the Philippines.

Echoing the words of Senator Loren Legarda, Constantino said that economic resilience, especially in the face of climate threats, entailed a strategic use of available funding from the local through to the international level.

VIDEO | Investing in Bamboo to Curb Floods in Kenya

In Kenya, floods and landslides killed around 100 people and displaced nearly 300,000 between March and May 2018. Smallholder farmers along the Upper Tana River basin are now investing in bamboo trees to curb floods.
Article

Many of the Kenyan communities affected by floods and landslides this year were already struggling to recover from the 2017 drought - a result of a failed rainy season in 2016 and unusually high temperatures.

"The rainfall patterns have completely shifted. We are receiving more torrential rains of high intensity, accompanied by flooding," Catherine Muthuri, a research scientist at the World Agroforestry Center in Nairobi, told DW.

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