Cancer

Survivor Advocate Program Shapes Future Research

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The 8th Biennial on Cancer Survivorship Research took place last week and I can’t think of a more meaningful or impactful way for us to have kicked off this meeting than by convening a group of engaged survivor advocates! This is just what LIVESTRONG accomplished, in partnership and collaboration with the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control.

Partnering to Help Survivors Address Financial Hardships

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Cancer care has come a long way in recent years, with breakthroughs and advancements in areas such surgery, radiology, symptom management, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. However, in many cases, these advancements have also increased the cost and complexity of care. For example, patients are now paying higher insurance premiums, deductibles, coinsurance and co-payments. The rise in care costs has created a new side effect for cancer patients– financial toxicity(1).

Partnering to Help Survivors Address Financial Hardships

Blog

Cancer care has come a long way in recent years, with breakthroughs and advancements in areas such surgery, radiology, symptom management, chemotherapy and immunotherapy. However, in many cases, these advancements have also increased the cost and complexity of care. For example, patients are now paying higher insurance premiums, deductibles, coinsurance and co-payments. The rise in care costs has created a new side effect for cancer patients– financial toxicity(1).

Sanofi Renews Commitment to Helping Children

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This post was authored by John Spinnato, Vice President, Sanofi North America CSR, and President, Sanofi Foundation for North America

Sharon’s LIVESTRONG at the YMCA Story

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In April 2015, I experienced some tenderness in my breast while lying in bed on my side. I did feel something, but had just had a normal mammogram in January. I assumed maybe I had gotten a knock in some house or farm work, but after a week it was still there. I got in quickly to see my OBGYN. That mammogram showed a growth and the subsequent biopsy revealed it to be malignant.

Uncovering a Level of Knowledge About Dog Lifestyles Never Before Seen

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Each year, 12 million dogs and cats are diagnosed with cancer. Many of these cancers have few treatments and no chance at a cure. In fact, cancer accounts for nearly 50 percent of all disease-related pet deaths every year, and is the leading cause of death in dogs over the age of 10, meaning many families are losing their beloved companion animals far too soon to this devastating disease.

Celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day by Sharing Your #LIVESTRONGVoice

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At LIVESTRONG, we believe that when people share their cancer stories it can empower, encourage and inspire others. In honor of Cancer Survivors Day, we invite you to share your voice with the world. Here are two ways to take part and share your story with others:

A Little Bit of Everything

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I was diagnosed with stage IIIA lung cancer October 24, 2006.  At 26 years old I was excited about the future, and cancer was not part of my plan.  For the next seven months I battled it with my family, friends, and medical team by my side.  At the time, chemo, surgery and radiation were the standard of care.   I was sick, I spent entire days in bed, my bones ached, my hair fell out, but there was a light at the end of the tunnel.  In June a CT scan and there wasn’t any cancer in my chest. I spent the summer getting back to work and getting back in shape.

Honoring Family by Running for Team LIVESTRONG

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Today is National Running Day. There are many reasons to celebrate running – exercise, health benefits and community. At LIVESTRONG we celebrate today to highlight why members of Team LIVESTRONG are running to raise money for our programs and services.

Sharing My Skin Cancer Story

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Telling people about my cancer diagnosis was not easy to do. At the time of my diagnosis, we were in a different world than we are today. I had some skin cancers that came up on the top of my forehead. I didn’t tell anyone about it. I didn’t tell family, parents, anybody else. I was a sophomore at the University of Texas playing golf. I didn’t talk to anybody because I was afraid I would lose my scholarship. I was afraid I would lose my opportunity to compete.

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