DRC

DRC Minister of Mines Joins Cobalt Action Partnership

Press Release

ALEXANDRIA, Va., Dec. 23, 2020 /3BL Media/ – The Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), as the Partnership Lead of the Cobalt Action Partnership (CAP), today with CAP Implementing Partners announced that His Excellency Professor Willy Kitobo Samsoni, National Minister of Mines of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), is joining the CAP Steering Committee. This step demonstrates a significant step to link the global desire for responsible cobalt supply chains with the important commitment of DRC government actors. 

RCS Global and Responsible Minerals Initiative Partner to Support Cobalt ASM Producers

Press Release

ALEXANDRIA, Va., and LONDON, April 21, 2020 /3BL Media/ – The Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) and RCS Global Group (RCS Global) have announced a new strategic partnership to scale their existing efforts to drive continual improvements in the production of artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Intel's Commitment to Responsible Minerals Sourcing

Article

Like many companies in the electronics industry, Intel and our suppliers use minerals in manufacturing. In 2008, we began work to ensure that our supply chain does not source certain minerals—in particular, tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold (3TG)—within the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) or adjoining countries from mines under the control of armed groups who exploit mine workers to fund crimes against humanity.

Global Witness Exposes Reality of Continued Conflict Minerals Extortion in South Kivu, DRC

Article

Last month, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) Mines Minister Martin Kabwelulu issued a formal statement recognizing adverse issues influencing the fraud and smuggling of conflict minerals in South Kivu. Minister Kabwelulu called for a thorough clean-up of the area’s mining sector.

GAO Says That Companies Struggle to Determine If Conflict Minerals Help Fund Armed Groups in the DRC

Article

On August 25th, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a 56-page report on findings regarding the 2015 reporting year SEC Conflict Minerals Rule filings. This year, over 1200 publicly-traded companies were required by Dodd Frank Act Section 1502 (Conflict Minerals Rule) to file annual specialized disclosure forms and conflict minerals reports.

3TG is Just the Starting Point for Supply Chain Investigation

Summary: 

Cobalt is a mineral that leads to human rights violations in the Congo, but is not one of the minerals included in the Dodd-Frank Section 1502 Conflict Minerals Rule. Cobalt is an example of why 3TG should just be a starting-off point for companies investigating their supply chains, which can help uncover potential areas of risk and instances of unethical sourcing

Article

Cobalt is a mineral that leads to human rights violations in the Congo, but is not one of the minerals included in the Dodd-Frank Section 1502 Conflict Minerals Rule. Cobalt is an example of why 3TG should just be a starting-off point for companies investigating their supply chains, which can help uncover potential areas of risk and instances of unethical sourcing

Registration Is Open for the AIAG Conflict Minerals Industry Briefing V

Popular Fifth annual event brings the latest in Automotive Conflict Minerals reporting
Newsletter

REGISTRATION IS OPEN!

Will Everything Change in Conflict Minerals Reporting Year Three?

Blog

On Tuesday, The Monetary Policy and Trade Subcommittee of the US House of Representatives Committee on Financial Services held a hearing entitled “Dodd-Frank Five Years Later: What Have We Learned from Conflict Minerals Reporting?” with the following witnesses:

Conflict Minerals Management: A Year Round Effort

Article

Just three weeks after the second conflict minerals filing deadline, many companies are ready to sweep conflict minerals under the rug until next year, but should they?

Reporting year 2015 marks the third year of the Dodd-Frank 1502 law, and the first year supply chain scrutiny is increasing. Come this time next year, publicly traded companies will have to understand whether or not there are conflict minerals in their supply chain as the filing distinction “undeterminable” will no longer be an option.

Human Rights Groups Turning Up the Heat on Conflict Minerals

Article

The Dodd Frank Section 1502 conflict minerals regulation and human rights organizations have “dramatically shrunk,” the market for untraceable 3T conflict minerals, according to a recent article by the LA Times, How to Cut Militias off From Gold and Mineral Mines in Congo.” Human rights organizations and groups have been turning up the heat on manufacturers of electronics and electronic parts that use tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold in their supply chain.

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