regenerative agriculture

Where Conservation and Food Intersect

Summary: 

Editor’s note: This is the latest post in our “You Grow, Girl!” series highlighting female farmers – from the northern reaches of Canada to the heartland of the U.S. From the western coast of Africa to the rolling hills of France and beyond. The series amplifies the voices of female farmers, who play vital roles in agriculture worldwide. Here, they share their unique perspectives on food, family and farming.

This post is from Ashley Minnerath, site director at the Cascadian Farm home farm. In this role she oversees all aspects of business, operations, research, production, and outreach at the farm. Born and raised in Minnesota, Minnerath spent many weekends on her grandparents’ farm where she learned a love of nature and respect for farmers. She is passionate about the unique role that farmers can play in the stewardship of natural resources and community health. This passion is brought to light in everything she does at the home farm.

Blog

Editor’s note: This is the latest post in our “You Grow, Girl!” series highlighting female farmers – from the northern reaches of Canada to the heartland of the U.S. From the western coast of Africa to the rolling hills of France and beyond. The series amplifies the voices of female farmers, who play vital roles in agriculture worldwide. Here, they share their unique perspectives on food, family and farming.

This post is from Ashley Minnerath, site director at the Cascadian Farm home farm. In this role she oversees all aspects of business, operations, research, production, and outreach at the farm. Born and raised in Minnesota, Minnerath spent many weekends on her grandparents’ farm where she learned a love of nature and respect for farmers. She is passionate about the unique role that farmers can play in the stewardship of natural resources and community health. This passion is brought to light in everything she does at the home farm.

Healthier Soil, Better Climate?

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Organic food is growing in popularity. We can almost predict what’s next: “Regenerative agriculture.”

It’s a holistic approach to farming that could, among other things, halt and even reverse some of the food system’s contribution to climate change.

Here’s how it works:

One of the places carbon is naturally stored is in soil. When soil becomes depleted by certain farming practices, such as tilling, so does its carbon bank. When soil can’t store carbon, more carbon lives in the air and becomes a greenhouse gas that’s harmful to the environment.

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