vaccine

Pampers’ “1 Pack = 1 Vaccine” Celebrates 10 Years of Impact

Blog

There's no denying that cause marketing has evolved from its inception over 30 years ago. Campaigns are flashier, consumers are more critical and the issues are more complex. And although some pundits may be issuing the cry to "kill cause marketing," it's hard to argue with the incredible impact a strong and compelling cause marketing campaign can make on the world around us. This year, one campaign celebrates 10 years of life-changing work through a simple call to action.

World’s First Malaria Candidate Vaccine – Not-for-profit Price – Receives Positive Opinion from European Regulators.

World Health Organisation will now assess how this might be used alongside other tools to prevent malaria.
Summary: 

GSK researches and develops innovative medicines, vaccines and consumer healthcare products and make them accessible for more people in a responsible way. One key area where GSK is involved is in tackling diseases without treatments that impact the poorest. This is core to its responsible business approach – the way it does business. So, this announcement that GSK’s malaria candidate vaccine, MosquirixTM (RTS,S) has received positive opinion from European regulators for the prevention of malaria in young children in sub-Saharan Africa, is an important milestone for GSK. GSK is also committed to extending access - irrespective of where people live or their ability to pay. GSK has, therefore, committed to a not-for-profit price for RTS,S so that, if approved, the price of RTS,S would cover the cost of manufacturing the vaccine together with a small return of around 5 percent that will be reinvested in research and development for second-generation malaria vaccines, or vaccines against other neglected tropical diseases. 

Press Release

GSK researches and develops innovative medicines, vaccines and consumer healthcare products and make them accessible for more people in a responsible way. One key area where GSK is involved is in tackling diseases without treatments that impact the poorest. This is core to its responsible business approach – the way it does business. So, this announcement that GSK’s malaria candidate vaccine, MosquirixTM (RTS,S) has received positive opinion from European regulators for the prevention of malaria in young children in sub-Saharan Africa, is an important milestone for GSK. GSK is also committed to extending access - irrespective of where people live or their ability to pay. GSK has, therefore, committed to a not-for-profit price for RTS,S so that, if approved, the price of RTS,S would cover the cost of manufacturing the vaccine together with a small return of around 5 percent that will be reinvested in research and development for second-generation malaria vaccines, or vaccines against other neglected tropical diseases. 

Ebola Vaccine Candidate Ships to Liberia

Blog

Today marks an important milestone in the fight against Ebola—and our work with many partners to develop a vaccine for it. The first batch of the GSK/NIH candidate Ebola vaccine left Brussels this morning and will land in Liberia in West Africa this afternoon.

Flu Vaccine May Hold Key to Preventing Heart Disease

A new study in Vaccine explains how flu vaccines prevent heart attacks
Press Release

Amsterdam, October 21, 2014 /3BL Media/ – Flu vaccines are known to have a protective effect against heart disease, reducing the risk of a heart attack. For the first time, this research, published in Vaccine, reveals the molecular mechanism that underpins this phenomenon. The scientists behind the study say it could be harnessed to prevent heart disease directly.

Twitter a Popular Source for Vaccination Information, Debate

Press Release

Washington, DC, May 30, 2013 /3BL Media/ – Twitter is a popular source for receiving and sharing new information about vaccines, and also a basically reliable one, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

The Risk of Autism Is Not Increased by “Too Many Vaccines Too Soon”

Press Release

Cincinnati, OH, March 29, 2013 /3BL Media/  -- Although scientific evidence suggests that vaccines do not cause autism, approximately one-third of parents continue to express concern that they do; nearly 1 in 10 parents refuse or delay vaccinations because they believe it is safer than following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) schedule (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/parent-ver-sch-0-6yrs.pdf).  A primary concern is the number of vaccines administered, both on a single

Pages

Subscribe to vaccine