John Pospisil

Posts by This Writer

8 years 5 months ago

The world is full of buzzwords and catchphrases.  Sometimes these are counter-intuitive.  "Sustainability" brings to mind vision of socially meaningful behavior with long-term goals in mind.  In recent years, the word "finance" likely summons memories of a worldwide recession, Greece and Ireland teetering on the brink of total failure and the United Kingdom adopting austerity measures.  Specifically in the USA, "finance" can make a person think of bank fraud, a mortgage crisis, TARP, a high rate of unemployment in the USA and the emerging threat of a second recession.  ...


8 years 9 months ago

A few weeks ago, I posted an article that largely agreed with a researcher's findings that people are naturally resilient and many coping interventions are minimally useful or potentially harmful.  A reader responded, and I promised to go back and look at my sources.  This article summarizes some positive aspects of coping interventions following natural disasters.

Psychosocial support and professional care can be a strong, effective intervention after disasters.  In the case of natural disasters, such as the Orissa cyclone of 1999 and the 2004 tsunami that affected many areas including India, psychological...


8 years 9 months ago

Cymbalta.  Abilify.  Lunesta, Chantix and that drug for "when the time might be right."  As a consumer and especially as a psychologist, it unsettles me when I see television ads exhorting potential clients to ask a doctor about a specific drug.  Even if I do not believe general practitioners or specialists know best, I do not believe consumers should ask for specific drugs.  To me, without any science behind my opinion, that seems like patients are being turned into marketing agents for pharmaceutical...


8 years 9 months ago

The world is full of people suffering.  Tsunamis, earthquakes, epidemics and other natural disasters are obvious stressors.  Acts of war and terrorism can be traumatic for the perpetrators, victims, medical personnel and bystanders.  On a family level, divorce, loss of a spouse, disease, loss of a child and even loss of a...


8 years 10 months ago

What can one person accomplish?  Dr. Paula Heron is a a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Kentucky.  Born in Zimbabwe, she's lived most of her life in South Africa.  Ten years ago, Ms. Heron came to the US to complete her Ph.D. in neuroscience and has remained here.  She decided to combine her triathlon experience with a passionate stand against human...


8 years 10 months ago

This is the second part of a three-part series focusing on human trafficking from a public health perspective.

Malaria affects over six million people per year.  Worldwide, more than two million individuals are infected with tuberculosis.  Each year, there are about two - three million new people who are newly infected with HIV.  Each disease is considered a public health problem and is preventable. ...


8 years 10 months ago

Jonathan Todres, Associate Professor of Law at Georgia State University, has a unique perspective on human trafficking. Whether this complex crime is a public...


8 years 11 months ago

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) finally has an eight-person team inside Libya, and reached three medical in facilities Benghazi. MSF issued a press release on their website indicating that the original team of six, along with medical and surgical supplies, was blocked at the Tunisian – Libyan border.

While it is currently unclear what the long-term health care needs in Libya will be after the revolt, there is an immediate crisis...


8 years 11 months ago

New premiums were blamed when families took more than 3000 children out of the Children’s Health Insurance program in Kentucky.  The same occurred in Arizona, when families meant to be helped by the state insurance program were unable or unwilling to pay the relatively small premium for coverage.  Over 1000 children were removed from the insurance program in Arizona.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as "health reform", "Obamacare" or any number of names...


8 years 11 months ago

A new medical technique can dramatically improve healing time for severe burn wounds.  The device looks more like a gadget from Doctor Who than one from a surgery room.  And the stem cells that form the tissue for healing the patient come from the patient.

People with serious injuries such as partial-thickness burns covering significant portions of their bodies are told two things on the way to the hospital:  the good news is if the burns were worse, they might die.  The bad news is that recovering from substantial partial-thickness burns can be one of the most painful and expensive...