Renewable Energy

Florida’s Untapped Solar Power

(3BL Media/Just Means) I've spent the summer living in historic St. Augustine, Florida. The surf is great, the people are friendly and the sun shines brightly every single day. The sun is powerful here, powerful enough it seems to produce enough solar energy for most of the nation.

UPS Has Set Lofty Goals

UPS has set some lofty goals. One of them is to have 25 percent of the electricity it uses come from renewable energy sources by 2025. In 2016, only 0.2 percent came from renewable sources.

L’Oréal USA Invests In Renewable Energy

L’Oréal USA is investing big time in renewable energy. Recently, the company that sells cosmetics and personal care products announced that it will build two solar power projects at its manufacturing facilities in North Little Rock, Arkansas and Florence, Kentucky. The projects will help accelerate the company’s goals to reduce its carbon emissions by 60 percent from a 2005 baseline by 2020.

Thinking About an Ethical Travel Destination Off the Beaten Path? Here Are the Top 10 Places to Visit Now

These developing nations don’t just have stunning natural beauty, they are champions of human rights, animal welfare, environmental conservation and renewable energy.

Google Is a Big Renewable Energy Investor

When someone thinks of Google they likely think first of their browser. However, Google should come to the mind of renewable energy enthusiasts. The reason is simple: Google invests in renewable energy, with a goal of powering its operations with 100 percent renewable energy.

Exclusive Q&A with Karen Clarke-Whistler, Chief Environmental Officer, TD Bank

TD continues green strategy with the first bank-led green bond in Canada

Denmark Announces 100% Renewable Goal

(3BL Media/Justmeans) - Denmark has just one-upped its status as the most cutting edge sustainable country in the world. They have committed to a goal of 100% renewable energy by the year 2050. That goal is not just limited to electric generation as other countries have done. They are including transportation as well. No burning of fossil fuels by 2050.

If that seems like an unrealistically lofty goal, keep in mind that these are the Danes we are talking about, who already get over 40% of their electricity from over 5,000 wind turbines, with every intention of making that 50% by 2020. Fossil fuel consumption is expected to fall by 20% over that same period.

While wind has carried most of the weight going forward, the latest initiative is more comprehensive. For starters, energy efficiency will play a major role. An intermediate target is looking for a 7% overall decrease in consumption from 2010 levels by 2020. Energy companies will be given specific targets.

Industrial heating and cooling is also a major part of the plan. Biomass will be substituted for coal on a large scale, for both heating and electricity. Subsidies will be provided for geothermal energy.

Also included are subsidies for energy efficient production processes, combined heat and power (CHP) applications, biogas, and smart grid. You could say the Danes are leaving no stone unturned in their search for a totally clean energy future.

What makes Denmark so successful while so many other nations are falling short?

Bulk Electric Storage Not a Requirement For Widespread Use of Renewables

 

(3BLMedia/Justmeans) - Physicist Amory Lovins has been at the leading edge of energy alternatives since well before most people ever heard of climate change. Far from an idealist, he is a hard-nosed scientist who has done the math to show what is possible if we are willing to think outside the box. His two latest books, Winning the Oil Endgame, and Reinventing Fire, lay out in detail the ways that our society can wean itself off of oil, coal and nuclear through a smart deployment of renewables, efficiency, with a bit of natural gas thrown in as a bridge fuel, all while growing the economy by double digits.

Lovins, along with his crew at the Rocky Mountain Institute put together a prototype 100 mpg Hypercar back in 2007, introducing groundbreaking technologies that car companies have been racing to catch up with ever since.

Now as the world has begun heeding his advice, Lovins has rolled up his sleeves to identify the various conceptual, physical, economic, political, and technological roadblocks that threaten progress and is busy dispelling them wherever he can. The latest is the idea that due to the intermittent nature of various energy sources, we can’t reliably implement renewables on a large scale without massive investments in energy storage.

Here again, Lovins has done the math, with a series of simulations. While it’s true that many renewables are intermittent, new smart grid technologies are quite responsive. Lovins presents the solution in terms of choreography, his word for a dynamic matching of electricity supply with demand. The fact is that sunshine and wind do come and go, but they do so in a fairly predictable manner. About as predictable, says Lovins, as the demand is. He also points out that since no power generation source is completely reliable, that grid has already been designed to accommodate that.

Baxter Reports Sustainability, Renewable Energy Progress

Baxter has released its latest sustainability report, presenting advances in emissions, clean energy and human rights.

With New Commitments, Walmart Shines as Renewable Energy Leader

Walmart Senior Vice President Larry Mahoney and Operations Manager Marc Sorce discuss logistics and sustainability at the 2011 Walmart Sustainability Milestone Meeting.

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